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Enceladus, Saturn's Amazing Snowball Moon

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    Enceladus, Saturn's Amazing Snowball Moon

    http://www.theatlantic.com/photo/201...l-moon/412864/

    Saturn’s sixth-largest moon, Enceladus (504 kilometers or 313 miles across), is the subject of much scrutiny, in large part due to its spectacular active geysers and the likelihood of a subsurface ocean of liquid water. NASA’s Cassini orbiter has studied Enceladus, along with the rest of the Saturnian system, since entering orbit in 2004. Studying the composition of the ocean within is made easier by the constant eruptions of plumes from the surface, and on October 28, Cassini will be making itsdeepest-ever dive through the ocean spray from Enceladus—passing within a mere 30 miles of theicy surface. Collected here are some of the most powerful and revealing images of Enceladus made by Cassini over the past decade, with more to follow from this final close flyby as they arrive.




    -Admin

    #2
    I don't believe this theory. The phenomenon is a electrical discharge in all likelyhood.
    Exactly like the comet they fired a probe into, great clams were made about finding water in it, them nothing, no water, no explanation. The universe is electrical in nature.
    Bigger the Government, the smaller the Citizen.

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      #3
      Originally posted by rover View Post
      I don't believe this theory. The phenomenon is a electrical discharge in all likelyhood.
      Exactly like the comet they fired a probe into, great clams were made about finding water in it, them nothing, no water, no explanation. The universe is electrical in nature.

      WRONG

      Wispy fingers of bright, icy material reach tens of thousands of kilometers outward from Saturn's moon Enceladus into the E ring, while the moon's active south polar jets continue to fire away on September 15, 2006. This structure is made visible with the sun almost directly behind the Saturn system from Cassini's vantage point. The sun-Enceladus-spacecraft angle here is 175 degrees, a viewing geometry in which structures made of tiny particles brighten substantially. These features are very likely the result of particles injected into Saturn orbit by the Enceladus geysers: Those injected in the direction of the moon's orbital motion end up on larger, slower orbits and trail Enceladus in its orbit, and those injected into the opposite direction end up smaller, faster orbits and lead Enceladus. In addition to the wisps, another unexpected detail is the dark gore in the center of the ring, following the moon in its orbit, likely brought about by the sweeping action of Enceladus as it orbits in the center of the E ring. #

      -Admin

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        #4
        Dramatic plumes, both large and small, spray water ice and vapor from many locations along the famed "tiger stripes" near the south pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus on February 2, 2010. The tiger stripes are four prominent, approximately 84-mile-long (135 kilometers) fractures that cross the moon's south polar terrain. This two-image mosaic is one of the highest resolution views acquired by Cassini during its imaging survey of the geyser basin capping the southern hemisphere. It clearly shows the curvilinear arrangement of geysers, erupting from the fractures. From left to right, the fractures are Alexandria, Cairo, Baghdad, and Damascus. #

        -Admin

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          #5
          no, Your wrong.
           
          Bigger the Government, the smaller the Citizen.

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