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It had a good run.

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    It had a good run.

    Scientists discovered an amazing Coral Reef hidden in the mouth of the muddy Amazon river. They are excited and surprised that they have never noticed it before.


    So I read the comments on some of the pages that are talking about it, and the tree huggers want to know what we can do to protect it and keep it healthy............

    I think it is fucked. The thing that kept it healthy for this long was that we didn't know about it. Now we will have to try to "fix" it.




    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2...t&sf24858640=1
    Let’s Go Brandon!!!!!

    #2
    It's really not surprising to me. I have been keeping reefs for over a decade. At one point, I had a store and ran thousands of gallons. I have done many experiments. In the reef hobby, so many people swear that it has to be a certain way. You have to have certain tank parameters. You have to have a certain amount of light. You have to keep your salinity in range. If you don't do all of these things, nothing will survive. Well, many things can survive. I once shut a 330 gallon system down, but left about 3" of water in the tank. I left junk corals, some snails, and some crabs in there with nothing but sand.

    A couple of months later, I emptied the tank. The snails were alive and well. The corals were shriveled and closed up. I figured they were dead, but I put them in a frag grow out system with perfect flow, light and parameters. They all came back. Granted, they were mushrooms and leathers (the most basic of corals) but they don't need perfect light and all that. Some consider them a nuisance coral. Just like the sponges these scientists pulled out. Most sponges are considered a nuisance in a reef tank.

    In that tank that I closed down, the only thing that didn't make it was the crabs.

    I'm sure that certain crabs would make it in that muddy environment. Many of the more simple organisms would live and could likely thrive in that rich silt flow.

    I love when "scientists" say they are sure that nothing can survive in an environment. Because when they are proven wrong, they look like jackasses. I'm very scientifically driven. Unless something is absolutely proven impossible, it's still possible. Never say never.



    Btw...reefs are about the coolest thing on the entire planet. There isn't a thing that goes to waste on a reef.
    Last edited by TheRabbit; 04-23-2016, 06:56 AM. Reason: stupid phone auto corrected reef to roof.

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      #3
      No telling what we haven't found yet on our own planet.

      Comment


        #4
        Lets not always be so negative mayaca. It dont matter. Some asteroid in 2033 going to kill us all. Coral reefs will make it.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by rab View Post
          Lets not always be so negative mayaca. It dont matter. Some asteroid in 2033 going to kill us all. Coral reefs will make it.
          That does sound encouraging.
          Let’s Go Brandon!!!!!

          Comment


            #6
            What's a reef?
            I don't know.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Harvey_Wideshaft View Post
              It's really not surprising to me. I have been keeping reefs for over a decade. At one point, I had a store and ran thousands of gallons. I have done many experiments. In the reef hobby, so many people swear that it has to be a certain way. You have to have certain tank parameters. You have to have a certain amount of light. You have to keep your salinity in range. If you don't do all of these things, nothing will survive. Well, many things can survive. I once shut a 330 gallon system down, but left about 3" of water in the tank. I left junk corals, some snails, and some crabs in there with nothing but sand.

              A couple of months later, I emptied the tank. The snails were alive and well. The corals were shriveled and closed up. I figured they were dead, but I put them in a frag grow out system with perfect flow, light and parameters. They all came back. Granted, they were mushrooms and leathers (the most basic of corals) but they don't need perfect light and all that. Some consider them a nuisance coral. Just like the sponges these scientists pulled out. Most sponges are considered a nuisance in a reef tank.

              In that tank that I closed down, the only thing that didn't make it was the crabs.

              I'm sure that certain crabs would make it in that muddy environment. Many of the more simple organisms would live and could likely thrive in that rich silt flow.

              I love when "scientists" say they are sure that nothing can survive in an environment. Because when they are proven wrong, they look like jackasses. I'm very scientifically driven. Unless something is absolutely proven impossible, it's still possible. Never say never.



              Btw...reefs are about the coolest thing on the entire planet. There isn't a thing that goes to waste on a reef.
              WTF ?


              #crablivesmatter
              ~" If you suck ass long enough, pretty soon you start choking on shit."~

              Comment


                #8
                I like snorkeling on reefs.

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