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    Why it's Bad for the US :

    To Bring Drugs, or Allow Drugs to be Brought into the Country Even With a Permit :

    I'll be laying out a lot of different info for the next little while, then I'll wrap it up at the end. You know how I roll.
    Last edited by Talon; 05-14-2016, 08:36 PM. Reason: Added last sentence.
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    #2
    You do make a compelling case.
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      #3
      Lot's of people seem to have forgotten about Iran/Contra. Ollie North was reportedly up to his elbows in the drug trade, but lot's of people worship the ground he walks on for some reason, while at the same time calling for low level drug offenders to be "locked up!"


      Lot's of good info in the National Security Archives.

      http://nsarchive.gwu.edu/NSAEBB/NSAEBB2/index.html

      "North's notebook lists details of his meeting with Noriega, which took place in a London hotel on September 22. According to the notes, the two discussed developing a commando training program in Panama, with Israeli support, for the contras and Afghani rebels. They also spoke of sabotaging major economic targets in the Managua area, including an airport, an oil refinery, and electric and telephone systems. (These plans were apparently aborted when the Iran-Contra scandal broke in November 1986.)"


      "On February 10, 1986, Owen ("TC") wrote North (this time as "BG," for "Blood and Guts") regarding a plane being used to carry "humanitarian aid" to the contras that was previously used to transport drugs. The plane belongs to the Miami-based company Vortex, which is run by Michael Palmer, one of the largest marijuana traffickers in the United States. Despite Palmer's long history of drug smuggling, which would soon lead to a Michigan indictment on drug charges, Palmer receives over $300,000.00 from the Nicaraguan Humanitarian Aid Office (NHAO) -- an office overseen by Oliver North, Assistant Secretary of State for Inter-American Affairs Elliott Abrams, and CIA officer Alan Fiers -- to ferry supplies to the contras."
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        #4
        http://www.cnn.com/US/9811/03/cia.drugs/

        "WASHINGTON (CNN) -- The CIA overlooked or ignored reports that the Nicaragua Contra rebels financed their fight to oust the communist Sandinistas through the sale of drugs in the United States, according to an internal CIA report."


        "The report details cases where the CIA dissuaded other federal agencies, notably the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), from probing the activities of Contra groups and their contractors. In one instance, the CIA discouraged the DEA from examining Oliver North's efforts to evade legal restrictions on Contra aid through a secret supply operation in El Salvador, according to the report."
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          #5
          Congressional Record: A Tangled Web: A History of CIA Complicity in Drug International Trafficking

          Institute for Policy Studies

          http://fas.org/irp/congress/1998_cr/980507-l.htm

          "NOVEMBER 1996

          Former head of the Venezuelan National Guard and CIA operative Gen. Ramon Gullien Davila is indicted in Miami on charges of smuggling as much as 22 tons of cocaine into the United States. More than a ton of cocaine was shipped into the country with the CIA's approval as part of an undercover program aimed at catching drug smugglers, an operation kept secret from other U.S. agencies. "

          http://www.nytimes.com/1993/12/03/op...t-edlarry.html

          "In Costa Rica, when the war against Nicaragua's Sandinista government was at its peak and cocaine was beginning to pour into the United States, the DEA attaché wanted to place cameras at clandestine airstrips from which he suspected drugs were being flown to the United States. The CIA resident gave him a list of airstrips on which he was not to place cameras. They were the strips into which the CIA was flying arms for the contras. Some were also strips from which the DEA agent suspected drugs were being flown to the United States."
          Last edited by Talon; 05-15-2016, 11:50 AM.
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            #6
            I like weed.
            https://csagovernment.org/index.html

            http://deovindice.org/

            http://dixienet.org/

            http://leagueofthesouth.com/

            Comment


              #7
              Talon interesting stuff.

              I was involved with Counter Drug Ops down around Central and South America. I know there is some kind of shit still going on.

              We received or listen to the Big Wigs at Key West orders made us go wtf more than once. Their counter part out of Pearl Harbor didn't hear much from them even though we were in the Pacific, not far enough West lol. .

              Comment


                #8
                Bureau of Prisons stats. 46% of the prisoners are there for drug offenses. I would guess that the percentages are about the same at the state level also.

                https://www.bop.gov/about/statistics...e_offenses.jsp

                e Drug Offenses 85,419 46.4%
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                  #9
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                    #10
                    The Stepan Company imports 100 metric tons of coca leaf into the US every year by special DEA permit.

                    http://www.bolivianexpress.org/blog/posts/coca-vs-cola

                    "Every year, the Stepan Company imports about 100 metric tons of coca leaf from Bolivia and Peru. At their plant in New Jersey, they supposedly remove the cocaine alkaloid from the leaves and sell the cocaine-free leaf to Coca-Cola for use as a flavouring. This is all “legit”: in fact, Stepan Company’s plant is the only one authorized by the US Federal Government to import and process the coca plant. But Los Tiempos raises three interesting points:

                    1. Coca-Cola specifically uses Erythroxylum truxillense, or coca de Trujillo, the variety of coca leaf that contains the highest levels of cocaine alkaloid.
                    2. According to research done in Bolivia, it’s almost impossible to recover flavour from the coca leaf once it has gone through the cocaine-removal process.
                    3. Access to Stepan Company’s plant in New Jersey is said to be more difficult than the Federal Gold Reserve at Fort Knox."
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                      #11
                      http://www.narconews.com/Issue31/article569.html

                      https://news.google.com/newspapers?n...,1346835&hl=en
                      December 20, 2002
                      This week, Bolivia’s undersecretary of Social Defense, Ernniano, reported t his office had
                      uthorized the exportation of 350,000 bricks (about 159 tons) of coca leaf to the United States “for the manufacturing of the soft drink, Coca-Cola.”

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                        #12
                        http://blog.oup.com/2014/03/coke-coc...ness-strategy/

                        "What Coke liked about its relationship with Stepan was that it kept the soft drink firm out of the limelight, obfuscating its connection to a pesky and tabooed narcotics trade.
                        But Stepan was just part of the procurement puzzle. The Federal Bureau of Narcotics (FBN) also played a pivotal role in this trade. Besides helping to pilot a Hawaiian coca farm, the US counternarcotics agency negotiated deals with the Peruvian government to ensure that Coke maintained access to coca supplies. The FBN and its successor agencies did this even while initiating coca eradication programs, tearing up shrubs in certain parts of the Andes in an attempt to cut off cocaine supply channels. By the 1960s, coca was becoming an enemy of the state, but only if it was not destined for Coke."
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                          #13
                          By combining letters of the Anslinger Papers with those of the National Archives, a relationship emerged between Harry Anslinger and The Coca-Cola Company Vice President Ralph Hayes.

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                            #14
                            Harry Anslinger was the long-time commissioner of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics. Best known for his fervent campaign against marijuana, Anslinger was also an important character in the history of Coca-Cola.

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                              #15


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